Posted in friendly fire, Lifesong Kenya, men of influence, Running for My Life, Something about the name of Jesus, Standing with boys, Thank God its Friday Night, The gift of blindness, the making of Jim Buttons

Doing a Jig in the Name of Jesus

Doing a Jig in the Name of Jesus

“God provides the wind, Man must raise the sail. ”

― Augustine of Hippo

I am dancing and doing a jig in the Name of Jesus. Peter Mbugua a.k.a Pistar finally reported to Bible College yesterday after 10 years of waiting on, and trusting God to provide for Bible College! Elisha and I were in a celebratory mood throughout the 150.6 KM trip to and from Machakos. Of course, this has earned me more responsibilities because Pistar reported to college lacking many basic things.

 

“Did anyone from our group share anything with you?” I asked.

 

“No one,” he replied.

 

“Its okay, God has got you covered,” I replied, sad that no one sent him money after I had requested them to.

 

I discovered Pistar had taken a huge leap of faith the moment we entered the office and the receptionist started ticking off the things every First Year student must report with at the college. Fortunately, I had some money with me, and much as I knew it was meant for something else, I decided to close my eyes and do what a brother would have done. And by the time Elisha and I dropped Pistar off at the college, I had remained with nothing other than the jig we had done in the Name of Jesus.

“So what do we do with these things?” we wondered because we didn’t have kerosene in our stoves and couldn’t cook the relief food we had received.

The background to doing a jig in the Name of Jesus

 

Waiting and trusting God to provide for Bible College for 10 years isn’t a joke. I kid you not. I admire Pistar and his resilience to hang in there even when the rest of us didn’t totally understand his desire to go to Bible College. Pistar has come along way – right from the many years he was on the streets and to the many times he shared his dreams and desires with us. Of course, we haven’t known Pistar for 10 years. I have personally known him for the past 4 years.

 

There were many instances, nearly every year, when Pistar would share with us his desires, dreams and vision to evangelize to street boys and juvenile prisoners. Yet, strangely enough, we never took time to share in his vision and see what and how best we could help turn his dreams into a reality.

 

I remember one particular period when Pistar and I used to receive ‘relief food’ from friends and the church. One particular instance stands out from the rest. It was on Christmas and we had received packets of rice, sugar, flour and cooking oil. A lady friend had also brought us cake, which we enjoyed sinking our grateful teeth into thanking God that someone thought about us.

 

“So what do we do with these things?” we wondered because we didn’t have kerosene in our stoves and couldn’t cook the relief food we had received. We had everything we needed to whip up a Christmas meal, yet we didn’t have the means of turning what we had into food! That day we discovered you can never have everything you need in life. We referred to those days and had a hearty laugh.

 

“By the way, Pistar,” I said, “Look at every experience you have ever had as a preparation to the ministry God is equipping for. And who knows, you may even meet your future wife here, well, I don’t mean that is why you are here….!”

 

“Ha-ha-ha,” he laughed, revealing twin dimples on either side of his clean shaven cheeks.

 

“Allow God to use you as He wants,” Elisha added.

 

As we started driving back to Nairobi, I prayed and asked God for a miracle in terms of getting money to replace what I had used to cover Pistar’s expense. I also came with a list that has the other things he needs for his stay in Machakos.

 

 

 

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Author:

Hey, I'm a born again Christian writer, biker and runner, also known as Jim Buttons. I'm a full time blogger so I can have free time to empower boys in juvenile prison. I enjoy writing web content and conducting reading camps for children.

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